An I for an i

Often, in written Irish, one sees things such as I gcás, or I rith, or I ndiaidh i.e. an upper case I in the middle of a sentence, when a lower case i is what is needed. What is the reason for this? A computer that is too smart?

The reason for this, of course, is AutoCorrection at work, such as is practiced by Word when English is the working, or editing, language that has been set for the application. Of course, in English, the first person (nominative) is written as I, and not as i (for some historical reason), so computers automatically correct an error, as they perceive it, when a lower case i is written on its own, with a space before and after it. Of course, this does not suit other languages, such as Irish.

There are several ways around this:

... change the editing language to Irish

The way to do this is described elsewhere on this site.

This is a quick change, and it can be reversed back to English when the document has been written, if required.

... or remove that particular correction from the list of AutoCorrections

It is assumed that the English version of Word or Writer is what is being used in this case.

In order to remove this AutoCorrection, follow the indications for AutoCorrection (See previous page) and remove the entry for the word i from the list.

This is a simple change that takes just a moment to implement.

VISITORS' OPINIONS  
LibreOffice - The Choice for Irish

We recommend it to anyone who is writing in Irish do download and use the free computer application called LibreOffice. This is an excellent wordprocessor that hosts a spellchecker and thesaurus, for example. One can make PDFs from documents easily as well.

In LibreOffice, it is possible to open MS Word documents, make changes, and save again as a MS Word document, if required.

An Foclóir Beag (Dictionary)

An Foclóir Beag, the Irish/Irish dictionay, is available on line. It offers more than the print version; for example, one can see verbs and adjectives in all their forms.

Potafocal

If you are looking for information, including translations, related to a word, you might not need to look any further than potafocal.com. This site uses many different resources to present to the user many different aspects related to the word. It even contains straight links to well-known sites such as focal.ie. It is well worth a visit.